6 Ways to Save Money by Going Green at Work

Tesla’s hyper-sexy cars and expensive solar roofs may have you believing that going green is only for the rich and famous. But don’t let Musk convince you that being environmentally-friendly needs to cost a fortune. Here are six simple ways you can go green whilst actually saving money for your business:

1.  Government subsidies

The government is trying to incentivize going green, and there’s a good chance you’ll get a rebate for being environmentally friendly at work. If you’re short on cash on a rebate approved investment, a good idea may be to get a small grant, or a cash advance from Cash Stop to install the technology required to go green. Considering how these newer and sustainable technologies are cheaper to operate, you can expect some considerable savings over time.

2.  LED costs less

There’s no doubt that LED bulbs cost more upfront. However, they are designed to last nearly 25x longer than other bulbs. Over time, these smart LED lights can cost nearly a third of what incandescent bulbs would cost you.

Switching all your bulbs to LEDs could save your business thousands of dollars each year, and the government estimates it could save the country a total of $30 billion by 2027. LEDs look better and are more customizable, so there’s really no good reason not to get them.

3.  Upcycle furniture

Used or recycled furniture will probably cost less to buy and is great for the environment. Old chairs and desks can easily be refurbished for use in your office.

4.  Save money on travel by working from home

A report from 2013 found that nearly half of all the staff at the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) worked from home. This is because the department responsible for conserving the environment knows what’s best for it.

Working from home cuts out the single biggest pollutant – vehicular emissions. It also costs the business less to provide heating and lighting for employees when they turn up to work. Large firms like IBM and Microsoft have saved tens of thousands of dollars per employee who chose to work from home.

5.  Conserve Water

Even a relatively small office can save nearly $300 a year by using water-efficient appliances. You can probably go a step further and replace your toilet and heaters with the latest technology to conserve even more water each year.

6.  No More paper

Paper isn’t expensive, but larger firms use a ton of it and much of it is wasted. Over time, the costs add up. Digitizing completely means less waste and substantial cost savings, depending on the size of your business. Some large firms have saved millions in paper costs alone.

Going green isn’t always expensive. These are just some of the sustainable moves you can make to cut costs while saving the planet.

What You Need to Know About Setting Up an Office

All businesses of some sort end up needing an office. This can be as small as the corner of your den, an office in your home, or actual space that you lease to run your office out of. Why you need this office will depend on the nature of your business. Most offices are taking care of the administrative and financial aspect of your business. Before you decide to open an office, there are a few things you need to take into consideration.

What Size Do You Really Need?

Determining who is using the office is going to give you an indication of what size you need. If it’s just you so that you can handle your bookkeeping and emails at the end of a work day, then a simple home office will do. If you have human relations, accounting, IT, and marketing, they will indicate the leasing or purchase of your space. If you are going this large, make sure you have plenty of space for growth and stay well within your budget.

Shop for Internet

No matter what you are doing in your office, you will need internet. There are a slew of office internet providers and it takes some time to find the best ones. You are looking for a reliable service in all manner of weather. You also want a fast service so that you can get through your tasks with efficiency. It also helps to find fiber optic service rather than cable or DSL. Fiber optics are simply faster and ensure transfers of data over long distance without degrading the data. Fiber optics are not available everywhere and can be expensive to install. Be sure you can get fiber optics and that it’s within your budget.

Furnish It with Necessities

Shopping for office furniture can cause anyone to get caught up and swept away. Keep it simple and takes care of your needs. If you are leasing or purchasing a space, all of your furniture should match among the departments. For storage, get what you need plus one year’s worth of growth so that you are not constantly purchasing more filing cabinets. All chairs should be comfortable and provides support so that no matter how long you are seated, you are not straining your body too much. If your office space is carpeted, floor mats at the desks will allow for rolling chairs to move easily. If you have overhead lighting, you can avoid desk lamps.

Keep Office Equipment to a Minimum

Purchasing office equipment is yet another expense that is easy to get carried away with. Get exactly what you need to perform your duties. If you are in a home office and travel a lot, skip the desktop pc and opt for a laptop. If you are leasing/purchasing office space, desktops are more efficient for your employees. Sales teams of course would benefit from laptops rather than desktops. Printers for a home office should only include extras you use. No need to get a scanner option if you will never use it, unless the printer with the scanner is a less expensive option! Printers for a larger office space often need more bells and whistles but you can minimize how many printers you obtain. Many can be hooked into a network and folks can share the printer. One other option you can consider is leasing equipment, rather than purchasing it.

Office Supplies Are Your Friend

Office supplies can be your most costly expense in an office. Of course, you should buy exactly what you need and keep them plentiful in the supply closet. No matter what size office you have, getting a rewards card to your local office store will be greatly beneficial to help you save on your supplies. Look for those deals and watch how much waste you create. If you can avoid printing on paper, you should.

Hopefully, your endeavor into opening an office is an exciting time for you and your business. Take these extra steps to pay attention and make the most of your space without breaking your budget!

Filing for Chapter 7 Bankruptcy: Some Pros and Cons

The phrase “filing for bankruptcy” might be the most terrifying in the financial vocabulary (perhaps next to “Great Recession” and “bank run”). However, if you’re contemplating this serious decision, then be assured if you move ahead that you won’t be alone. Each year, hundreds of thousands of people across the country file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy for a variety of reasons, such as excessive medical bills, job loss, divorce, over-investing in the stock market, the list goes on.

Naturally, this isn’t a decision that you can afford (figuratively and literally) to make based on raw emotion or overwhelming anxiety. Yes, being in serious is debt is scary. Actually, it’s terrifying; especially when creditors start closing in, and threats of wage garnishment and asset repossession start flying fast and furious. However, the essential thing to remember throughout this challenging time is that “filing for bankruptcy” is not a subjective condemnation, or an expression of financial failure. Indeed, some of the world’s most successful and important people have filed for bankruptcy, including Walt Disney and Abraham Lincoln.

Rather, bankruptcy it’s a form of legal protection that’s designed to protect you (that’s right, you), so that you can restructure and reorganize your debts and, eventually, regain your financial footing. While it’s obviously not a list of anyone’s favourite things, there’s no shame in filing for bankruptcy. It happens thousands of times a day.

The best — and frankly, the only — thing you can do right now is equip yourself with hard facts. To get you started in the right direction, here’s a rundown of some pros and cons of filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy based on the advice of experienced bankruptcy attorney Charles Huber:

Chapter 7 Bankruptcy: PROS

  • Unlike Chapter 13, Chapter 7 doesn’t involve a detailed repayment plan. Instead, a trustee sells non-exempt assets and uses the proceeds to pay creditors per the Bankruptcy Code.
  • The process is faster than most people believe, and is usually over within 3-6 months.
  • Most states have exceptions that prevent certain assets from being liquidated.
  • Some filers may be allowed to keep more of their property than they need.
  • Filers will be able to keep their salary and assets the purchase after filing for Chapter 7.
  • Creditors must stop calling, email or communicating with debtors immediately after a Chapter 7 bankruptcy filing.
  • Filers who’ve had wages garnished by creditors within 90 days immediately preceding a Chapter 7 filing may be allowed to get that money bank.

Chapter 7 Bankruptcy: CONS

  • A Chapter 7 filing stays on a credit report for 10 years, and will doubtlessly make it tougher and more expensive to borrow funds, get a mortgage, or even get a job.
  • Filers lose all of their credit cards, and any property that isn’t except from sale (including luxury items).
  • Contrary to what many people believe, filing for Chapter 7 doesn’t except filers from child support payments, alimony obligations, or student loan payments.

The Bottom Line

Deciding to file for Chapter 7 isn’t easy — and that’s a good thing, because it’s something that should only be (possibly) done after careful research, which includes consulting with an experienced bankruptcy attorney.

However, regardless of how difficult things are right now or what has happened in the past, if starting now you do the right things, the right way, and at the right time, be assured that you’ll emerge financially stronger than ever — and will look back on this as a bump in the road vs. the end of the line.